RanCiel810

carudamon119:

メーテル ‏@_maeter  
あ…ありのまま今起こった事を話すわ鉄郎… 『ホームで999を待っていたら、ヤマトが来た。』 な…何を言っているのかわからないと思うけど、今にわかるわ、今に… RT @kusukusu0525: ヤマト急便さんが素敵♥️(σ≧∀≦)σ 
pic.twitter.com/eJ5rL1SSkJ
carudamon119:

メーテル ‏@_maeter  
あ…ありのまま今起こった事を話すわ鉄郎… 『ホームで999を待っていたら、ヤマトが来た。』 な…何を言っているのかわからないと思うけど、今にわかるわ、今に… RT @kusukusu0525: ヤマト急便さんが素敵♥️(σ≧∀≦)σ 
pic.twitter.com/eJ5rL1SSkJ

carudamon119:

メーテル ‏@_maeter  

あ…ありのまま今起こった事を話すわ鉄郎… 『ホームで999を待っていたら、ヤマトが来た。』 な…何を言っているのかわからないと思うけど、今にわかるわ、今に… RT @kusukusu0525: ヤマト急便さんが素敵♥️(σ≧∀≦)σ 

pic.twitter.com/eJ5rL1SSkJ


anoncentral:

No Vietnamese Ever Called Me Nigger: Wise words of the former world-famous professional boxer Muhammad Ali. In an era defined by endless war—when he was drafted and was told that he must fight the communists—his reply was, “No Vietnamese ever called me a nigger”. Consequently, Ali was stripped of his title, expelled from boxing and sentenced to five years in prison.

anoncentral:

No Vietnamese Ever Called Me Nigger:

Wise words of the former world-famous professional boxer Muhammad Ali. In an era defined by endless war—when he was drafted and was told that he must fight the communists—his reply was, “No Vietnamese ever called me a nigger”. Consequently, Ali was stripped of his title, expelled from boxing and sentenced to five years in prison.


npr:

It was an ordinary Friday. Courtney Brown, 24, of Kalamazoo, Mich., was busy looking for a job. “I’ve applied all kinds of places,” she says. “Wal-Mart, Target, Verizon Wireless.”
Then she got a strange letter in the mail. “‘We are writing you with good news,’” she reads to me over the phone. “‘We got rid of some of your Everest College debt … no one should be forced to mortgage their future for an education.’”
The letter went on to say that her private student loan from a for-profit college, in the amount of $790.05, had just been forgiven outright by something called the Rolling Jubilee.
Since November 2012, Rolling Jubilee has purchased and eradicated about $15 million worth of debt arising from unpaid medical bills. Today, the group announced that it has erased $3.9 million in private student loans, including Courtney Brown’s and almost 3,000 other students of the for-profit Everest College.
These People Can Make Student Loans Disappear
Illustration credit: LA Johnson/NPR View Larger

npr:

It was an ordinary Friday. Courtney Brown, 24, of Kalamazoo, Mich., was busy looking for a job. “I’ve applied all kinds of places,” she says. “Wal-Mart, Target, Verizon Wireless.”

Then she got a strange letter in the mail. “‘We are writing you with good news,’” she reads to me over the phone. “‘We got rid of some of your Everest College debt … no one should be forced to mortgage their future for an education.’”

The letter went on to say that her private student loan from a for-profit college, in the amount of $790.05, had just been forgiven outright by something called the Rolling Jubilee.

Since November 2012, Rolling Jubilee has purchased and eradicated about $15 million worth of debt arising from unpaid medical bills. Today, the group announced that it has erased $3.9 million in private student loans, including Courtney Brown’s and almost 3,000 other students of the for-profit Everest College.

These People Can Make Student Loans Disappear

Illustration credit: LA Johnson/NPR